An incredible dream for local couple!!

I’d heard something vaguely on the radio, but didn’t realise that the dream that became a reality was one that happened to a local couple!!

Our local paper reported on the incredible dream come true. Such a wonderful and amazing gift by an insurance company, through one of our popular radio stations, The Hits, helping a family through a difficult time….I have added the article from the paper……

Dreams come True The Post 20 July 2016

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Franklin………our changing face

Franklin – our wee patch of NZ, like many others I guess, is ever changing, as the years move on…….

Pokeno of yesteryear
Pokeno of yesteryear

Just one instance is –

Pokeno, our neighbour down the road in the Northern Waikato part of Franklin, has been through many changes over the years – going from a fairly busy village as per our photo, to an area by-passed by the modernisation of the highway/motorway and now back again towards being a busy town with it’s new and increasing housing areas.

The town also has Yasihili, the new Infant Formula Factory, being built. It will  be interesting to see how this helps to build the region with employment, visitors and growth in general!

Yashili is part of a major group that leads the dairy market in China. To help us achieve our preeminent position there, we have been a longstanding importer of New Zealand milk powder. Now we are taking that one step further – we are not just sourcing our milk powder here; we are producing our finished goods here. Our $200 million investment in Pokeno focuses on the development and construction of a 30,000m2 manufacturing plant. Our annual production capacity of around 52,000 tonnes of infant formula products will supply the rapidly growing and increasingly demanding Chinese market.
To help us achieve our potential in New Zealand we are looking for the brightest and best people in dairy manufacturing to come on board with us. We have job opportunities in manufacturing, supply chain and quality management. Come and join us and be part of our team that is putting Kiwi expertise on the world’s stage.

Yashili is one of the “big three” producers of infant milk formula for the domestic market in China. Our two leading brands, Yashily and Scient, and the more recently introduced Merla brand account for more than 80 per cent of Yashili Group’s total business. Yashili is also one of the leading suppliers of soymilk powder, cereal, rice flour and milk powder for adults and teenager to the Chinese market. Our products are sold in just over 105,000 retail outlets in China. In July 2012, we were named among the top 500 Most Valuable Brands in China for the ninth consecutive year. Yashili Group employs over 5000 people and reported an annual turnover in 2011 of NZ$566 million. We are publicly listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. In June 2013, China Mengniu Diary Company announced plans to acquire Yashili Group. Mengniu, China’s largest producer of liquid milk products, is part owned by China’s state-backed agricultural and food industry supplier COFCO.

Building Future Capacity
China’s infant formula market is expected to grow to NZ$32 billion by 2017, according to Euromonitor data. The increasing demand for infant milk formula is being driven by families shifting from rural locations to the cities, a stable birth rate, more mothers going out to work, and increases in disposable income. The challenge for Yashili and other manufacturers is to keep pace with demand while maintaining a high level of quality control. That’s why we have looked to New Zealand and its internationally recognised expertise in the manufacture of quality milk powder to build our newest dairy processing. Yashili already promotes the high quality of New Zealand-sourced milk content in our premium brands.  We have imported milk powder from New Zealand for over 10 years and we have used New Zealand milk powder exclusively in our infant milk formula since August 2010. Now we are adding further value to our product with Kiwi manufacturing expertise, and the support of the country’s skilled labour force.

Be Careful out there………

In light of the recent tragedies on our roads throughout New Zealand, and also here in Franklin, I think that we all need to be aware that none of us are “bullet-proof”
Franklin SH1Some time ago, I was asked if we could put some info onto our website to help overseas tourists understand about the driving requirements in our region and New Zealand as a whole, which we have been very happy to do –

If you’re visiting the Franklin region from overseas you’ll find our beautiful countryside and sinuous roads excellent to drive on. You’ll need to know a few rules so you don’t inadvertently break the law and get a fine, or worse, cause an accident.

The main things you need to know are:

· We drive on the left

· Using a hand-held mobile phone to call, text or access services while driving or stationary at traffic lights is illegal.

· Our speeds and distances are posted in kilometres per hour and kilometres. 100km/h is around 60mph and is our open road speed limit. The urban limit is 50km/h.

· If your licence is in English you can drive in New Zealand for up to a year. However, if your licence is not in English you will need to get an International Driving Permit or an authorised translation to English to accompany your licence.

· Children up to age 7 must be in an approved child seat and all occupants must wear seat belts.

· The blood alcohol limit is 0.05%, but we recommend that you don’t drink at all if you drive.

There are quite a few differences in road signs and road markings. You can take a free Road Code quiz at this website, and NZTA produces a booklet called What’s Different About Driving in New Zealand, which you can download here.

If you are not used to driving on the left hand side of the road you will need to pay special attention to give way (yield) rules, lane markings, indication rules and particularly what to do on roundabouts where you will be going clockwise, not anticlockwise.

We hope you enjoy your stay in the Franklin region, and whether you’re taking a scenic drive to the lighthouse or Port Waikato, heading off bird watching at Miranda, or visiting one of the many historic regional towns, stay safe and alert on the roads.

We all need to understand our driving habits and make sure that we do so safely. It is a tragedy to lose family and/or friends through lack of understanding, over confidence or just plain stupidity.
Now that the weather is getting cooler and there is more rain, it becomes increasingly apparent that we need to watch the conditions in which we drive.
NZ has winding roads, many of which are narrow, and although locals become confident in knowing the road, there is always the chance that an unexpected vehicle/bike/person/animal/road slip, will be where there was nothing previously.

Take your time and enjoy being able to stop safely to look at the view, have a break or a quiet cuppa.
So ” be careful out there” as they used to say on the tv show Hill Street Blues, many years ago 🙂

Who says there’s nothing to do?……..

If anyone thinks that the school holidays are boring with nothing to do in Franklin Country, think again! Especially if you have an interest in racing, cars, trucks, markets, to name but a few.

Check out our photos and ideas here

United V8 Spectacular 2015
United V8 Spectacular 2015
Franklin Street Rodders Show & Swap meet at Mauku 2015
Franklin Street Rodders Show & Swap meet at Mauku 2015

Gypsy Travellers market 2015markets pic

Frankly crafty market dates for 2015
Frankly crafty market dates for 2015
gorgeous handmade giftware at Frankly Crafty market
gorgeous handmade giftware at Frankly Crafty market

If you feel energetic, how about a bit of a run at the Waiuku Sand to Mud fun run, on Sunday 12th?Sand to mud run pic

…and look out for more things happening in our patch.
If these things don’t catch your eye, then there is always the local cinema for the latest movies (and if the weather turns to custard!)
So stay awhile at one of our fantastic accommodation providers and have an awesome weekend in Franklin Countrywhere Auckland meets the Waikato

Franklin’s Fresh Taste

Well – the time has arrived!

Fish - Taste Franklin

Franklin‘s very own special Taste Fest is on here at Karaka on Saturday 21st March. It should be a great experience.
Some info about the show from one of our local papers –
Franklin Taste Festival March 21, 2015

Come stay and play at our place in Franklin for a great getaway!!

Rural Franklin – where we grow fresh!

Welcome to Franklin Country – where Auckland meets the Waikato

The Franklin district is strongly defined by urban and rural areas, outstanding natural landscapes and open green spaces. It is also regarded as both a desirable and accessible ‘lifestyle’ destination for those seeking an alternative to city living. Traditionally Franklin has supplied the Auckland region with fresh produce and today market gardens still remain a feature of the district’s landscapes providing an appealing backdrop to the building developments that are taking place within the area.

As one of New Zealand’s fastest growing regions, Franklin offers not only excellent residential options and recreational opportunities, but also access to the goods and services available in much larger centres.

Families relocating to Franklin are attracted by the benefits that country living provides such as more space and larger sections while at the same time recognizing that Auckland and its attractions is just 45 minutes away by motorway.

The Fresh Grower 1 (2)

The Fresh Grower 1 (3)

The Fresh Grower 1 (4)

The Fresh Grower 1 (5)

The Fresh Grower 1 (6)

The Fresh Grower 1 (7)

A few weeks ago, I had the privilege of attending a “Picnic in the Paddock” that was put on by one of our local growers, Allan Fong from The Fresh Grower, with help and support from a number of family, friends media and businesses associated with Allan’s business.
The weather played its part too, with the sun shining over the marquee in the paddock.
Inside the marquee some of talented young locals,(some of Allan’s family I think) played gentle background Chamber music, while the guests chatted and had a glass or two of wine or juice.

Allan’s son was the chef – Ryan of Ryan’s Kitchen.What great food, company and a generally wonderful day here in Franklin – with local people showcasing local food right where much of it is grown – here in Franklin Country.
The Fresh Grower 1 (8)

(Ryan attended the Food Show earlier in the year – view his youtube video)
These guys have been in the news a few times over the years, and with Franklin holding our very own Taste show next March, we’ll no doubt be seeing and hearing much more from our local home-grown producers!
Allan and Ryan Fong in the field 2014

Who’s into history?

As I was reading through some emails and general info, I came across a bit of a write up about how things had been in the very early days in Tuakau……
waikato-river-near-taupiri-c-1880-photographed-by-burton-brothers-alexander-turnbull-library

By the time the immigration ships like the Ganges started to arrive, (it sailed into Auckland on the 14th February 1865 with over 400 passengers), Alexandra Redoubt and Cameron Town had been built. The land wars
were over, during which some big military boats had been used on the river (including one that had boiling water circulating the hand rail around the deck so it couldn’t be boarded from the river).

It’s hard to think about transport before motor vehicles, but the use of a horse if you owned
one or had feed to feed it, could be ridden, pull a sledge or wagon and in Tuakau’s case the
Waikato River was flowing right past. The town plans were drawn up to be by the river with
the added security of Alexandra Redoubt handy. Interesting to think about the early settlers and boats, nobody brought one with them and you couldn’t buy an aluminium boat and outboard at the store – did the Maoris manufacture and sell dug out canoes to the settlers?

The main trunk line was first planned to come to Tuakau landing and follow the river south;
by the time the train came through Tuakau, closer to Harrisville to Mercer in 1875 (10 years
after the Ganges arrived). With goods coming in boats over the bar to the wharf at Port
Waikato and no road to Tuakau – stopped by the swamps around Te Kohanga, as was the
train stopped at Mercer where you had to get a boat to Ngaruawahia because of the Wangamarino swamps. At this time several commercial boats were working on the river between Port Waikato and Hamilton with
landings at the likes of Tuakau, Mercer and Huntly.
With the coming of the railway in those days gave great access to the Auckland markets for produce, Percy Lapwood, a very early Tuakau carrier, wrote of pigs that had been brought by river from Aka Aka and Otaua to the Tuakau landing then transported to the Tuakau railway to go to Auckland and the same with flax and
tins of whitebait and it was not uncommon to pass a horse and sledge or even someone pushing a wheelbarrow between the river and the railway.